5 Things To Know About Related Pins For Your Pinterest Strategy

Earlier this week, Pinterest revealed that they are beginning to roll out a new “related pins” feature which allows users to rate the pins they want to see more of as well as the content they would rather not see.

The 5 Things to Know About Pinterest's Realted Pins

Pinterest has been pretty busy the past few months. From the release of rich pins to the announcement of promoted pins, it’s obvious Pinterest is looking to make the experience better for users and marketers alike. And their most recent release, related pins, is no exception. Below we list the five things you need to know about taking advantage of related pins in your Pinterest strategy.

1. What Related Pins Actually Are.

Slowly but surely, Pinterest will be adding more and more related pins. These pins will be marked with “Related Pin” in the bottom left corner and a small “i” in the bottom right.

A Related Pin in the Wild

When you click on the “i”, Pinterest brings up a dialogue box with the reason they choose the pin and the choice to either give the pin a “thumbs up” or a “thumbs down”, depending on whether or not you like what you see.

Related Pins Thumbs Up or Down

For instance, I pin a lot of fun hair and makeup ideas so Pinterest thought I might like this “cat eye” pin. When I clicked “thumbs up,” Pinterest tells me:

A related pin I like

If you’re not such a fan of one of the suggested pin, then you hit the “thumbs down” button and Pinterest will tell you:

Not a huge fan of this related pin..

So, in summary, you hit “thumbs up” if you like a pin and “thumbs down” if you don’t. Simple as that!

2. Make Hyper-Targeting Even More Hyper-Targeted.

With this feature, Pinterest is giving users even more control over their already hyper-targeted content. Now, a user can not only follow the boards they’re interested in, they can decide what content is relevant to them. Because of this, users will either choose to give your content a “thumbs up” and see more of it, or they’ll give it a “thumbs down” and you won’t spam users with little-to-no interest in your company. With a less cluttered feed, those users who are engaged with your brand will have an easier time seeing and interacting with your content on Pinterest.

3. Curate More Relevant Content.

Pinterest places cookies on your browser to track what websites you go to as a way to put content you might like in your feed. If you work at a Pinterest analytics company and your marketing manager loves to shop online and look at cute cat pictures, your company’s feed might end up looking a bit funny (not that this has happened to us before…). You can turn off the cookies from Pinterest but, alternatively, simply giving a “thumbs up” to content related to your company and a “thumbs down” to content related to your personal interest, you have more control over the pins in your feed.

4. Related Pins + Getty Images Analysis = Fewer Homeless Pins.

There are few things as irritating as a pin that doesn’t link to anything – especially for the person who created the image. For photographers, artists and marketers alike, the potential copyright issues can be a real deterrent for using Pinterest as a marketing platform. Because of this, Pinterest recently began a partnership with Getty Images in the hopes that their vast array of data around images will help Pinterest better place the original location and link of those pins without a home. Now that Pinterest is both suggesting content and helping to protect the original image owners rights, those with copyright concerns can take advantage of Pinterest without fear of their images ending up homeless and abandoned.

5. Pre-Cursor to Promoted Pins?

Although Pinterest insists that related pins have nothing directly to do with the future of promoted pins, it is supplying them with even more interest data for each user. Like Facebook before them, by collecting such detailed information on users interests and behaviors, Pinterest has the potential to offer incredibly well-targeted promotions, saving advertisers both time and money. Who doesn’t love that?

 

Where do you see the future of related pins going? Let us know in the comments!

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  • duskrayne

    I hate the related pins!

    • Melissa Megginson

      Oh, why is that? I actually haven’t seen very many of them yet, so I’m curious to know what you’re experiencing!

      • duskrayne

        Melissa, at least 75% of my page is related pins, and I haven’t seen but one so far that was of any interest to me at all. It clutters everything up so terribly that I have a hard time finding the pins that I want to see – those of my friends and family. I find the related pins very intrusive. I have read a lot of comments on their blog and their facebook page from other users who are as adamantly against them as I am. I am giving it a week or so to see if this is going to be permanent, and if it is, I am just going to cancel my account.

        • Carrie Campbell

          I agree, I am having a very hard time wading through the cluttery amount of related pins this morning trying to find pins from the pinners I actually wanted to follow. Twitter did the same thing when they started displaying Retweets from people I didn’t even follow, sigh.

          • Melissa Megginson

            As of now there’s no way to turn off related pins completely, but you can make it so Pinterest doesn’t place cookies on your browser to suggest pins from websites you visit. I have mine turned off and I see very few related pins in my stream.

            To disable the browser cookie, click on your name at the top right, select “Settings”, and turn off the “Personalization” setting. It will also help if you give the related pins a “thumbs down” when they pop up.

            Hope this helps!

        • cc

          Might be behind you!! Since Dec 2013-they still won’t fix my notifications, can’t get them. Use to get many comments & exchange stuff. Plus they deleted a whole SECRET BOARD (NOT VIEWABLE TO ANYONE) Board w/ thousands of pins on medical & health.WHY? I had a partial male patient w/colostomy on him. I was researching the surgery & sites i could go back to. Anyone could tell it was a medical pic!! Some of the changes upcoming are not very beneficial for my uses. THEY SERIOUSLY NEED TO EDUCATE THEIR STAFF a whole lot better!!! So many folks complain about pins/boards deleted for nudity/sexual nature-WHEN NONE WERE PRESENT!!! happened to me on 2 occassions. People are fed up. Now they wanna junk it up more!! I fear every time I get on here….WTH is gonna be deleted now. Have enough stress!!! Sorry for rant & thank you!!!

  • Carrie Campbell

    Is there a way to opt out of Related Pins? I follow VERY few pinners in order to be able to keep up with the stream of images. The related pins are cluttering up my feed!

    • doodlebug4952 .

      Sadly, no, no opt out option. I’ve had an ongoing with Pinterest customer service about this hateful new “feature.” They simply couldn’t care less what the customer wants.

  • Ren

    My page is FULL of them, and now the option to like or dislike a related pin is not even on my page anymore..
    I don’t think I will be using Pinterest much in the future..

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  • Merel

    I don’t have the thumbs up/down button :(

  • Rocky

    I had “related pins” showing on my feed and complained long and loud every day to the help desk. Finally it’s gone. If it comes back, I’ll be the one who is gone.
    It makes no sense to advertise Pinterest as something we curate but then not allow us to do so. IRRITATING!

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  • Louise Zuzu Crosbie

    the so called “related” pins are always irrelevant and not in any way representative of my tastes or interests. I really wish we could turn them off. I spend ages clearing the junk from my page just to come back to new pins that are also in no way relevant. drives me nutty.

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  • http://freelancer-plus.tumblr.com/ Zebedeerox

    This is a great move. I’m a writer and research thousands of bytes of info that I haven’t the slightest interest in.

    The old “You might also like” was garbage for me; as is AdWords, but that’s another story.

    Pinterest has now given us the ability to validate what we like, rather than base its judgement on erroneous cookie reporting.

    A similar system has worked wonderfully well for StumbleUpon for years. Give “related pins” time to get to know you and Pinterest will become, as you suggest:

    “…Even More Hyper-Targeted.”

    A huge thumbs-up from Wolverhampton!

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  • Barb Snow

    Related pins are a nuisance. They aren’t interesting at all, I have spend time thumbs downing them and they so clutter my page that I miss pins I subscribe to. I hate them.

  • lotatao

    I HATE RELATED PINS!! this is supposed to be a site that I curate, yet related pins add a bunch of crap i would NEVER put on my board. I think it’s a terrible idea to force them on us. I”m no longer using Pinterest because of it.

    • cc

      Totally agree!!

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  • Lacy Amoeba

    I am going to quite Pinterest if Related Pins are mandatory.

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