Your Pinterest Business Plan

Your Pinterest Business Plan

An issue that we see many businesses run into when using Pinterest is trying to figure out to make it flow with the rest of their online presence and marketing efforts. If the thought of this has been haunting you, we have awesome news- it’s extremely easy, and you definitely don’t need a separate Pinterest business plan. By following these simple guidelines, Pinterest can be a seamless (and extremely helpful) part of your business plan.

Include Your Logo on Your Photos

While it may seem like a hassle to go through and incorporate your logo into all of your pictures that you pin, it is worth the extra time and effort. This way, there will be no question that people will always associate these pins with your company, and if the pin sparks their interest, they will know where to go to look for more. Additionally, with the amount of times people pin and repin content, there is no telling what could happen with the pin. An example of what could happen is that people could save your original image and pin it as a new image. Users who see this new pin will have no idea where they can go to find this product if the image itself does not include your logo, providing no benefits for them or you. However, if your logo is included, they will know exactly what to search to find what they want.

When incorporating your logo, it is important not to compromise the quality of the image. Rather than stretching a big logo (ex: a watermark) across the entire image, place the logo in a place where it does not interfere with or compromise the image, such as in the corner or to the side.

Format Your Website to Be Compatible with Pinterest

Don’t let this title intimidate you, making your website Pinterest-complementary is easy to do. By downloading a “Pin It” widget and placing it on all of your website’s content, both you and consumers can effortlessly pin items straight from your website onto their boards. Not only does this help you get even more of your items out there on Pinterest, it can actually help you see which of your products are popular and intriguing to your online users, and which of them do naturally well on Pinterest.

Provide Useful Information in Your Captions

While Pinterest is a primarily visual platform, everyone needs a little information. As we have stressed many times, Pinterest is aspirational and many people go on Pinterest with the intention to shop, so make it easy on them, and you. Provide information in the captions that you know that shoppers would want to know. A product description, sizes/colors the product comes in, where it is found on your website, prices and any other relevant information should be included. Put as much information that you can while still keeping it simple and uncluttered. You don’t want to provide so much information that consumers are overwhelmed and don’t read it all, but you also don’t want to leave them guessing.

Organize Your Boards

Like we said, many people turn to Pinterest for the purpose of shopping, so make your Pinterest profile easy for them to navigate. Make boards centered around particular product categories, just as you provide categories on your website. For instance, if you are a clothing store, it would be smart to create boards such as “Dresses and Skirts,” “Jeans,” Blouses,” “Accessories,” etc. This makes sure that your customer doesn’t have to do any guesswork and can easily find something in the category that they need.

Interact

What is a huge goal of online marketing? Engaging and interacting with consumers. Don’t let Pinterest be any different. To go along with the interaction you have with people on your other platforms, show your Pinteresters that you are interested in them too. Follow those that have content that you would be interested in, repin others’ content that can be relevant to your boards and even leave comments on impressive pins. You can even take it a step further and leave comments thanking others for sharing your pins. This will help you maintain your goal of developing meaningful and useful relationships with your customers.

That doesn’t seem too scary, does it? Following these tips will get you the start you need to include Pinterest in your business plan.

We want to hear your advice! Let us know any other ways you know of to implement an awesome Pinterest business plan.

 

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  • Vincent Ng – MCNG Marketing

    I strongly agree with the last point. I think companies need to interact because that’s what social media is. I know people share things casually on Pinterest, but part of the truth is that they want to be recognized for what they pin. I noticed that not everyone will respond, but if you do engage with people who pin directly from your website, I would say, in my experience about 25% will actually become followers.

    I think it’s also important to ensure that many businesses start to think about mobile and how that integrates with Pinterest. With 75% of Pinterest usage happening on smartphone or tablets, that’s an enormous number and websites that haven’t been optimized for mobile viewing need to get on board (no pun intended).

    • Betsey

      I also agree, Vincent, well put. Where did you find that stat about 75% of Pinterest usage happening on mobile devices? That sounds like a report I would love to sink my teeth into. Pinterest is the king of the tablet, for sure, but I had no idea that the numbers were that drastic! If you could point me in the right direction so I could check out that report, I’d appreciate it! Thanks!

    • Melissa Megginson

      Great points as always, Vincent!

      It feels like it’s been year that marketers have been “predicting” mobile internet usage to be the wave of the future. Well, guess what? It’s happening! I know when I’m not at work, in front of my computer, my phone is my gateway to the web. If I can’t visit a sit on my phone, there’s an excellent chance I won’t visit it once I’m at a computer.

  • Jenny Lens

    I’ve been a strong proponent of logos/watermarks for two decades. Telling ppl to put the info in a corner is inviting pirates and thieves to do as they wish. It’s a HUGE issue for photographers. There’s even a tumblr site about “photo stealers.” You would not believe how many ppl steal photos by cropping out the corner logo/watermark, and putting their own info onto an image.

    IF you are going to protect and market your work, be it photos themselves or photos of products you sell, put the logo/watermark where it is VERY difficult to cover or crop off. I am not saying a big ol’ ugly watermark like the big photo agencies. WHY do you think they do what they do?

    Make it LEGIBLE. Be sure the website or company/business name is VERY readable. No weird handwriting, italic or script fonts which are unreadable. No matter how much money you pay when you hire the popular logo designers. I often wonder if high-priced, so-called famous logo designers care if your logo is readable?

    These are major issues. Ppl simply refuse to believe this happens, til they whine about it when someone steals their work. Or can’t read their logo.

    I do not know why ppl will moan and groan when someone passes their work off as someone’s else’s, but refuse to take the steps to protect their work. Can’t have it both ways!

    Do it right or don’t bother.

    • Melissa Megginson

      Totally agree, Jenny.

      I’m a member of a Pinterest marketing group board that has sadly been overrun with spammers. I get SO annoyed when I see one of them has stolen my image, but because I always put the Tailwind logo, users will at least know where to go to find the actual article.

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